What’s wrong with college basketball? Former LSU coach Dale Brown offers his answer

By LARRY VAUGHT

County former LSU coach Dale Brown as one not impressed by what the Commission on College presented in its report on how to reform/save college basketball.

“Reforming this broken, debilitating system is one of the social concerns of our times, and to continue to ignore the need for change will only irrevocably worsen an already strained situation,” said Brown, who is a huge fan of Kentucky coach John Calipari.

“Although there are many problems facing college athletics today, I still think there are answers.

“First drop the masquerade and eliminate all the rules that breed deceit, monumental hypocrisy, and legislation against human dignity. What’s gone wrong with collegiate athletics ?

“It isn’t all that complex. Greed, selfishness, power, money, and just not wanting to give up a good thing. “

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  1. Not sure I followed what he was saying really. He spoke in generalities, I like specifics. For example, start with changing the rule that allows a player to leave for the NBA after only one year at the college level. College scholarships should require at least a three year commitment IMO. If a player thinks he is good enough for the NBA after his high school or AAU career, then forfeit a college career, hire an agent, and go for it. Here is another, exercise strong enforcement of existing rules that apply, and hold NCAA officials accountable for their actions in such matters as well. This could be done by an appointed oversight committee formed to review controversial decisions handed down by the NCAA to more fully insure justice was served. For example the UNC fiasco. Drop the hammer on all schools and coaches who violate NCAA rules and regulations, no exceptions. Get more NCAA control over equipment contracts, coaches salaries, ticket prices, and player agent relationships. College basketball is broken, and I don’t know if it will ever get cleaned up with the money and salaries that it generates in the business today. I liked it better in the old days.

  2. The world, as we know it may soon end. I find myself in agreement with ‘de Pup. I say that with only one caveat. The NCAA is a totally incompetant, corrupt organization. Expecting them to control coaches salaries, ticket prices, et.al. is really a reach. The answer then ? Who knows, maybe entrusting the conferences to police their own. The NCAA will never be the answer……..for any situation
    Larry, they rolled out their first aged barrel of bourbon at WTD to much fanfare today. Not sure about their process yet but it’s a.decent bourbon. They put on a pretty good party as well.

    1. I went to Wilderness Trail today. Great day. Loved the bourbon as well as the shrimp/grits by Mallards and Dunn’s BBQ, too.

  3. The NCAA is corrupt and needs to be replaced with a governing body that consists of college presidents…a group of 5 who are selected by the group as a whole and serve single five year terms. Bring the student back to the term student athlete…require graduation or 4 years for scholarship players, whichever comes first before going pro in any sport. Also require a minimum 3.0 gpa to play in any sport…the student does come first in student athlete. Impose a first offense penalty of a 2 year ban from team competition for colleges found guilty of academic fraud or financial fraud; a 5 year ban for second offenses and the Death Penalty for a third offense. No more dumbing down your curriculum for athletes. Team practices would be limited to 2 hours per day to allow the student athlete time for study and participation in non athletic college activities. Bar shoe/apparel company contracts with colleges or college players/coaches, including commercials or endorsements of any kind. Ban coaches from being paid to do “sports shows”. Do away with conference tournaments…make the regular season champ the automatic qualifier to the NCAA tournament. At large bids would be limited to teams with a .600 or better winning percentage in their conference. Require true home and away games with all conference teams with conference size limited to 10 teams, thus breaking up the mega conferences. Football would be home one year and away the next but would play every team in their conference each year. I am sure there are other things that should be considered/implemented, but this would be a start.

  4. I admire Dale Brown, but his comments here are mired in the subjective. “Greed, selfishness, power, [and] money” in the sport are corrupting influences for sure, and I get his point on this, but the manner it manifests to corrupt is viewed by one person one way, and the next person another way. Therefore, the required “fix” is not defined due to the subjectivity of the allegation.

    I believe the NCAA is corrupt as well. Just today, Bill Self has been anointed by the NCAA to find the “fix” despite the inescapable fact that the most recent FBI charges involve Kansas, and players Self recruited and signed to play for the Jayhawks. The litany of examples that prove the depth of NCAA corruption is too long to recite each time this subject surfaces.

    I can recall a time that a school offered and gave 4 year athletic scholarships, and so long as a player hangs on, the program was obligated to honor its commitment to the player the program recruited and signed. This gave way, years ago, to the system of a series of one year commitments. The intention was to give a program the ability to shed itself of a non-contributor on the roster and bring in another player who would carry his own weight on the court. But, that one year commitment has had unintended consequences for the programs, and taken to the extreme, as it has occurred at UK in the Calipari Era, the big news of the spring occurs each April, May, and June when a “former” player opts to remain at UK rather than transfer to another school or leap into pay for play even if unprepared to make that jump to compete against grown men.

    I have loved college basketball since my youth. I have loved and cherished UK basketball since discovering it in my youth. Frankly, I am so frustrated by the direction and condition of both at this point that I am not sure where this is going to end for me, but I sense either the sport, and the way UK handles it for the Big Blue Nation, must change or I will find something else to occupy my remaining years.

    1. Professor, sadly there are a lot of people in BBN who feel the way you do. This isn’t college basketball; it’s an NBA farm team system. As a result, I am starting to lose interest in the NBA too since it has become a hodgepodge of what the “system” is producing.

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